Stick that Needle in my arm! – the case for amending Australia’s vaccine rollout scheme

Australia’s current COVID-19 vaccination scheme continues to lag behind our contemporaries in the UK, Europe and the US. As of May 7th, only 3.9% of Australia’s population had received their second COVID vaccine dose. While much of the blame may lie supply side, with the failure of the AstraZeneca vaccine and logistical inefficiencies between various health departments, another potential bottleneck may be the method Australia … Continue reading Stick that Needle in my arm! – the case for amending Australia’s vaccine rollout scheme

Breaking the glass ceiling: Deyi Wu

Interview with Deyi Wu, President Elect of the NSW Young Liberals Deyi Wu was named President Elect of the NSW Young Liberals last week. This makes her the first female President since Natasha Maclaren-Jones fifteen years ago. The Sydney Tory sat down with Deyi this International Women’s Day to reflect on the unique experience of women in politics and to hear her story. Describe your … Continue reading Breaking the glass ceiling: Deyi Wu

Curing the Cancer of Cancel Culture

The first classic novel I read cover-to-cover was Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). It served as a catalyst for my love of language and literature. The story reads like a gothic version of the myth of Narcissus. Dorian has a portrait painted of him. Dorian loves his beauty so much that he sells his soul to the devil to stay youthful while … Continue reading Curing the Cancer of Cancel Culture

Give Australia some space in the space race!

Australia has a history of putting to the wayside space issues and programs. Consequently, Australia lags behind the rest of the world in space innovation. It is now incumbent upon us to play catch up in the ‘space sector’. After all, we are the best country in the galaxy. Space has been left rather unexplored for the past 100 years following Neil Armstrong’s 1969 moon … Continue reading Give Australia some space in the space race!

Australia Day: The bond of Citizenship

On this day, seventy-two years ago, the Nationality and Citizenship Act 1948 came into effect, for the first time rendering those who lived within the Commonwealth of Australia as legal citizens of this country. Prior, they had only been British subjects, a uniform nationality status across the British Empire; any issued passports were British, not Australian.1 The Act allowed those of good character who resided … Continue reading Australia Day: The bond of Citizenship

COVID-19 and looking beyond ourselves

We live in a world where the only thing that matters is the ‘self’. It is an age where the concepts of ‘individualism’, ‘autonomy’ and ‘freedom’ are unchallenged. We take pride in our unfettered existence: we are at liberty to make our choices in our own world, subject to our own set of ever-malleable principles. Instant gratification is closely related to this obsession with ourselves. … Continue reading COVID-19 and looking beyond ourselves

An Appeal to Government: Govern According to Law

The coronavirus pandemic presents a novel challenge for the world. Novel, not in the sense that mankind has not encountered large scale medical or existential challenges before, but in the sense that our global community is more connected than ever, presenting a more difficult challenge for containment of the viral and economic contagion. Then of course there is the miasma of panic, itself a contagion, … Continue reading An Appeal to Government: Govern According to Law

The Ethnic Vote: An Uphill Battle Facing 21st Century Conservatives

Growing up amongst the Indian diaspora in Western Sydney, the message from the community was always that the conservatism was the institution of the xenophobic establishment, of white imperialism, racism and the oppressive British Empire. On the other hand, it was simply assumed that the Left were our true representatives, running compassionate and caring policies that sought to suppress racism and make us feel welcome. … Continue reading The Ethnic Vote: An Uphill Battle Facing 21st Century Conservatives

Is Preferential Voting indeed Preferable?

Australia is a unique country. It is the only country to use instant run-off voting (IRV), better known as preferential voting. The nation is split into 151 single-member electorates where the voters choose who they want as candidate by labelling every candidate in descending order of choice. If no candidate receives a majority, candidates with less votes are eliminated and their preferences redistributed until a … Continue reading Is Preferential Voting indeed Preferable?